Fear or Courage

Fear and Courage
Fear or Courage

Climbing up behind Christ

Fear or CourageFear or courage are interesting emotions, especially when we are climbing up behind Christ on His stallion. Simplistically, fear first occurs in an area of the brain called the amygdala. This is an important lifesaving brain part. Your amygdala sometimes moves you to escape even before you are aware there is a life-threatening problem. Certain of your sense organs (eyes, ears, tongue, skin and nose) constantly send signals to your brain. Your senses (what you see, hear, taste, feel and smell) filter into your brain, including through your amygdala, which evaluates those signals and decides if you are in danger. If the amygdala senses a threat it will communicate with your whole including with the motor area in your brain to take the necessary steps to prevent your injury. You need this protection. At this point you do not need courage, therefore you do not have a fear and courage conflict. You do need to protect yourself. The fear or courage problem surfaces when reality warrants the fear reaction and yet for your personal reasons  you seek to ignore your fear, such as saving someone out of a burning building.

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Fear or Courage

The Carousel and Christ

The Carousel and Christ

The Carousel and ChristChrist’s abundant life

The tension between the carousel and Christ and His abundant life will always be my focal memory of the fair. When I see a carousel at a park or in a store parking lot, both happy and struggling memories of the fair instantly return, most are carefree and happy. A few of my memories birthed out of a struggling young boy trying to be a man or at least an older boy. Because of Christ, the real differences were in me, not in the fair. In our area of the country, the fair happens once a year and every year it has roughly the same rides, games, rodeo competition, animals, and food. The fair did not change; what I did and who I was because of the fair changed.

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The Carousel and Christ

The Source of Strength and Direction

The Source of Strength and Direction

From Ol’ Red to Christ

We all have had to learn lessons about our source of strength and direction, and for me it was the source of strength and direction in my day to day adventure, especially as it had to do with what or who; for example, moving my source of strength and direction from Ol’ Red to Christ. The last time I talked about Ol’ Red, I shared how he was not just a token horse; Ol’ Red was a working horse and a reliable friend. I remember one day when Dad asked me to move the cows from the lower to the upper pasture. I hated the lower pasture, especially when it comes to moving the cattle. But since I was already down there I figured I could do it myself.

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The Source of Strength and Direction

Leaving the Carousel

Leaving the Carousel

Not as easy as it looks

Leaving the carousel seems like such a simple task. The problem for me was that when I left the carousel I knew my buddies and I would be moving on to “The Big Ones.” It would not have been so bad, except I had a problem with motion sickness and no amount of will power could overcome motion sickness on “The Big Rides.”  couple on ferris wheelThe Ferris Wheel was not a Big Ride because though it went high, height did not bother me. And besides, if you were with a young lady she might pretend she was scared and sit closer to you. But I do remember the Hammer. You sat in the end of a tube while the tube spun on its axis and the whole thing rotated like a Ferris Wheel, only much faster. When you came down you were looking at the ground coming up at you. When you were going up you had the feeling you were going to be launched off into space to land somewhere out of town. I do remember that ride. I felt really sorry for the people down below when I launched the corn dog I had just eaten along with some ice cream.

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Leaving the Carousel